Who Is Imagining The Future?

Who Is Imagining The Future?

One of the questions we’re all asking about—begging for, really—is what the future might look like. Where are we going, and what does the next year look like? I find myself searching for writers who have thought about this—people who have imagined it, who are dreaming about it, or have studied it. It turns out, there are definitely a few people who have written things like this, from winding forays into five-year futures, to epidemiologists and pandemic researchers thinking through so many of the layered consequences of viral diseases. Here are the people talking about what the future looks like, and a few ways to begin thinking about what’s next.

You Don’t Have To Be Okay

You Don’t Have To Be Okay

It’s okay not to have it figured out. It’s okay to not be productive. You’re allowed — I mean, even expected — to not be okay right now. It’s okay to be feeling whatever it is that you are feeling—grief, confusion, rage, fog, happiness, joy. Your life is your own, and it’s yours to feel.

Screw the fairytales

In my twenties, I was on track to fulfill all the obligations of being a woman in this society: engaged to be married, great job, graduate degree education, wanted to have kids. Society was happy for me, and that ring on my finger was the icing on the cake. The problem? I didn’t like the job, and I was wildly uncertain about the prospect of getting married, even though I’d said yes to the proposal. Then, over the span of a year, I lost my rib (it was taken out of my body through emergency surgery), I lost my fiancé, and I found myself in completely new territory. What happens after the fairy-tale ending? In most books, my engagement would have been the happily-ever-after. Here, I had a new lease on life, and finally, slowly, started listening to myself and what I wanted, instead.