The 20-Hour Work Week

Around December last year, I realized that I wanted to plan ahead for the year differently. I was tired of pushing for “more,” and feeling like I was spinning my wheels trying to do a hundred things at once. Instead, over a series of notebook pages, I started to sketch out where my time was going, and what I was truly working on.

The results shocked me — and they made me rethink how I set up my business in 2018.

Last week I had the chance to sit down with two amazing people, Kate Northrup and Mike Watts, on their podcast all about life, entrepreneurship, business, and babies. They are some of the most thoughtful and curious people I know, and I joined them to talk about how my planning process for 2018 changed how I think about my work, and where my energy is going.

On the show, we talked about:

  • How my workload changed dramatically and why I started a “do not do” list for 2018.
  • How many hours I truly have in a week to work, and the process I used to come up with the number.
  • The revelations I realized about my schedule.
  • What it means to plan ahead for both business and babies.
  • My renewed focus on consistency and simplicity.

Also, we chat a bit about my swim from Alcatraz (back in the day!) and how my husband ended up taking my last name. I really enjoyed the show, here’s a link for you to listen in.

Episode 74: The 20-Hour Workweek: Sarah Kathleen Peck from Startup Pregnant

And if you’d like to read through more on the process I used to cut back on 50% of my workload, here’s a link to my round-up post about it over on Startup Pregnant: Here’s The System I Used To Cut My Workload By 50% This Year.

Working Parents: Transforming What Work Looks Like

One of my favorite things to study and observe is how work is changing. Two decades ago, we didn’t have any of the social networks we have today. Three decades ago, email and the internet weren’t regular tools. So much about work is changing: what it looks like, what our expectations of it are, what our requirements are, how we engage with each other, where we work from. Some of the progress is great, while other areas still leave a lot left to be improved.

For Forbes’ last week, I got to write about eight entrepreneurial parents that are changing the way work looks, whether it’s through their company, or by how they’re showing up in the work world. I’m consistently inspired by entrepreneurs, and by parents. Here’s the article if you’d like to read about these outstanding entrepreneurs, and if you’re interested in parenting and leadership, you can also follow my column.Read the article

Never Choose Seven

A simple trick that helped me make better decisions. Truly—this mindset shift has stuck with me every since I learned about it many weeks ago.Read the article


I find there’s a secret magic in the written word. Here’s why it’s so powerful. Also — I interviewed Danielle LaPorte on the podcast, if you’re curious to listen in.Read the article

Leveling Up

Imagine your email inbox was filled only with messages from the highest players in your field. Oprah, Tim, Seth, Shondra. What would you do differently? Imagine your product becomes a hit sensation, and you have hundreds (or thousands) of new customers joining you every day. Are you ready? What would you do differently? Imagine theRead the article

Am I The Kind Of Person Who…?

Today I want to talk about habit shifts, and how to once again get back into a habit you want to cultivate when you veer off course. I’ve written about it before. The reason I keep writing about it is because habit shifts, like taking care of a physical home, take ongoing care and maintenance. Building habits is like taking care of a home, but it’s your person-as-home, your mental space, your human space. And I, like everyone else, need to clean my house on a fairly regular basis. And the habit of re-starting can be challenging. So I asked a good friend and coach for help. Her answer—and the question she shared with me—worked. It worked really well.Read the article

How to Finish A Book

One thing that’s come up after publishing my 2017 reading list is how surprised I am (and others are!) that I was able to read 53 books in a year.  True story: in 2016, I probably read 10 books, and finished … well, let’s say I read a lot of half books. It’s easy to get distracted by another book. Shiny object syndrome is real, and I found that I had started to skim everything. My obsessive reading of internet articles had made me a bad reader. This was a wake-up call. If I couldn’t finish a book, was I really learning? Here are the habits I changed last year to increase my reading. And also, my rules for how to decide when NOT to read a book.Read the article

Why I Tracked Every Book I Read in 2017

This year, I decided to track all of the books I read to see what was making it’s way into my mind. As part of my year of devotion and paying more attention to where I spend my mental energy, I kept a running list of all of the books I read. I also tracked theRead the article

Why I am Choosing to Email Slowly

I am by choice a slow emailer, and it often takes me a week or two to respond to messages. Sometimes longer. I think to myself, You do not really want me to be a fast emailer. Why do you want me to email quickly? Do you want me to sit at my desk, furiouslyRead the article

My 2017 Annual Report

Every year I do an annual review, and the process teaches me so much. It’s invaluable. Central to my work in studying who we are and why we do what we do is a steady aim of building life-worthy habits. I’m fascinated by my daily, monthly, and yearly habits, and how to continually improve my own performance. I’ve decided to go ahead and (gulp) share it, in entirety. I’m a bit nervous to do so, because when I started writing it, it was just for me. The insights are personal and raw, and it recaps a year that professionally, felt often like a struggle and a challenge. No triumph, no magic wand. There were solid successes: The mastermind program I built went well, and sustained my end of my agreements with my partner. The podcast was a surprise, and a delight. But writing? That was really hard this year. It felt like a failure.Read the article