Join me! Live podcast show in New York City — Thursday, August 9th

Friends! I’m joining the host, best-selling author, and founder of Unmistakeable Media for an intimate evening podcast recording of the Unmistakeable Creative Show. We’ll be taping live in New York City on Thursday, August 9th, after work. Join us. Tickets are sold in advance and are first-come, first-served, with an intimate venue and a limited audience size. Yes, I’ll be staying up late and waddling my big pregnant belly to a stage downtown to talk about startups, parenting, philosophy, and systems. Srini Rao is the bestselling author of Unmistakable: Why Only Is Better Than Best, and will be leading the discussion.

How to Do A Quarterly Review

One of my favorite practices as a business owner is to do a quarterly review and reflection. Each quarter I set OKR’s, or measurable goals, and reflect on the progress made in the last quarter. A quarter is a perfect amount of time to set a goal and make progress on it, and it’s a great interval to catch yourself if you’re not making any forward progress, either. For the last several years of my life, quarters have been the backbone of part of my planning process. Here’s what OKRs are, how they work, and my system for quarterly review.

How My Kid Teaches Me About Leadership

The learning curve of building a new human from scratch and re-wiring yourself as a parent and a functioning adult comes with plenty of challenges. Yet it also feels strangely familiar: like the long days of marathon training, or like the late nights studying to get your MBA on the side of your full-time gig. Here’s how parenting rewires us as leaders.

The Word You Keep Using

Our subconscious has a way of winding itself into our writing, if we’re paying attention. This practice always startles me, by reminding me of something that was sideways and not quite at the surface.

Why You Shouldn’t Give Up After One Launch

Launches aren’t easy. Sometimes when you launch, it’s the first time people are paying attention to you. They’re watching and learning and listening and waiting. Putting into the calendar for next time to join when you do it again. Listening, reading, learning. Finding out about you for the first time. Deciding and debating, hesitating. One data point—your first launch—is not enough data to make a decision. It’s only the start of an exploration. Your next steps? Here’s what I recommend.

If Facebook Went Away

If Facebook went away, what would change for you? How would you spend your mornings? Your workday? And what would you miss? And conversely, what would change for the better? It might be the biggest social network we’ve ever seen, but it’s also constantly changing, and it’s undergoing more investigation for its role in changing how our brains and communities work. Here’s what I’d miss, what would change, and why I still use it (for now).

One Hiring Mistake I See New Entrepreneurs Make All The Time

“I’ll start a podcast and interview people I know,” someone says. Twenty episodes in, and they realize that they’ve accidentally interviewed people that look identical—all one gender, all one race. Did they do it on purpose? Of course not. Most people don’t mean to. We don’t set out to say “Hey look, I think I’ll create the most biased podcast out there and only interview people that look like me.” But when we don’t pay attention, this happens over and over again. Here’s why it happens, why it’s important to notice it, and when to intervene to change it.

Letting Things Break

In the process of pursuing new ways of working, it means you’re going to build new habits. Building new habits isn’t always a piece of cake: sometimes it’s rusty, weird, and feels uncomfortable. If you want things to stay the same, then keep doing exactly what you’re doing. If you want to get new results, you have to try new things. Right now, there’s one area of my life where I’m deliberately letting things break, and it’s not pretty. It’s uncomfortable. And I’m probably going to disappoint people. Read what it is and why I’m okay experimenting with it.

The 20-Hour Work Week

Around December last year, I realized that I wanted to plan ahead for the year differently. I was tired of pushing for “more,” and feeling like I was spinning my wheels trying to do a hundred things at once. Instead, over a series of notebook pages, I started to sketch out where my time was going, and what I was truly working on. The results shocked me — and they made me rethink how I set up my business in 2018. Listen as I break down the process I used while live on The Kate & Mike Show!